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Trucker Fatigue Leads to Two-Semi Crash

We have often discussed the problems associated with truck driver fatigue. Quite simply, truck drivers spend so many hours behind the wheel that it is imperative they take special precautions to ensure that they remain awake and alert at all times. Failure to take steps to properly account for tiredness is an extreme act of negligence.

Yet for all the attention paid to truck driver fatigue, crashes occur on our roads all too frequently caused by sleepy truckers. One such accident struck yesterday involving two Chicago semi drivers. Interstate 65 was shut down for several hours Wednesday morning because of the wreck reports WLFI News.

Around 8:30am around mile marker 186 a Chicago trucker was pulled onto the southbound shoulder of the highway. While stopped on the side, the truck was struck from behind by another semi, a refrigerated box truck filled with produce also driven by a Chicago driver.

Investigators of the accident following the crash discovered that the driver of the produce truck was fatigued while driving. He had actually fallen asleep, leading to his truck drifting onto the shoulder of the road, striking the immobile truck. That second driver was cited by police for his fatigued driving.

Both drivers sustained injuries in the crash, but fortunately they were not life threatening.

Our Chicago truck crash lawyers at Levin & Perconti will continue to raise awareness of the risks associated with fatigued truck driving. Obviously all drivers should be awake and alert when behind the wheel. However, the problem is particular significant for truck drivers, because they spend so many long stretches driving. The fact that their vehicles are the largest on the road, capable of causing the most destruction, just makes their safety even more important. Truck companies and drivers themselves must have very clear plans and policies in place so that tired drivers take appropriate breaks.

See Our Related Blog Posts:

Truck Driver Fatigue Leads to More Trucking Accidents

Sleep Apnea Linked to Trucking Accident Rates